Cookstown and Moneymore join to remember fallen of WWI

Honoring The Fallen at the candlelight vigil to the mark the outbreak of the First World War at Cookstown Cenotaph
Honoring The Fallen at the candlelight vigil to the mark the outbreak of the First World War at Cookstown Cenotaph
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Cookstown and Moneymore Orange Districts are to come together for the first time in 60 years to hold a special joint parade to mark the 100th anniversary of World War One.

The joint parade will take place this coming Sunday, September 21 at 6.30pm at the Cookstown Cenotaph.

The service will be lead by the Rev Hugh Ross and the Rev Alan Cross and will take the form of a religious service followed by an act of remembrance and wreath laying by both Districts.

This will be the first time that County Tyrone and County Londonderry Districts have paraded together in Cookstown for over 60 years.

Cookstown District is asked to assemble at Cookstown Orange Hall at 6.00pm moving off at 6.15pm and parading to the Cenotaph.

Moneymore District is asked to assemble at Moneymore Road Corner, Cookstown at 6pm move off at 6.15pm and parading to the Cenotaph.

People of all faiths from across Ireland answered the call to fight for King and country with many paying the ultimate sacrifice and the districts have said this is ‘the is our opportunity to recognise their valour.’

They have encouraged everyone to come along and join in the service.

A number of events have been held across Mid Ulster this year to mark the 100th anniversary of the war.

Earlier this year, hundreds of people turned out at the Centotaph in Cookstown for a special candlelit Peace Vigil to mark the outbreak of the Great War which started on August 4.

The solemn commemoration was organised and led by the Royal British Legion in the town and associated organisations who proceeded with a lone piper from the Legion Car Park to the Cenotaph for a short service.

The service itself included an Act of Remembrance, Laying of Wreaths, Readings from Scripture and Prayers for Peace.

It was a fitting and unique Centennial memorial tribute to those from our community who were to suffer and die in the terrible carnage of that war.