Farmer gets retrospective permission for slurry tank 35m from Coagh home despite owner’s pleas

Aerial view of Sunnyside Road, Coagh where retrospective planning permission was granted for a slurry tank 35m from a home
Aerial view of Sunnyside Road, Coagh where retrospective planning permission was granted for a slurry tank 35m from a home

Mid Ulster’s planning committee has granted retrospective approval for a 658sq.m slurry tank 35m from a home, despite the pleas of Coagh woman Anne-Marie Campbell.

Making representations against the application, Mrs Campbell begged councillors not to approve it, as she had planning permission to improve the dwelling just 35m away for her son, his wife and their expected baby.

There is just 35m between the house and the slurry tank

There is just 35m between the house and the slurry tank

Speaking to the committee she said: “It’s 35m from the gable wall of our house.”

Outlining the fact she had permission to upgrade that property before the tank was installed, she said its existence raises concerns around potential odour, vermin and flies, as well as its close proximity to what she plans to make a family home.

“I beg of you to reconsider. It’s an eyesore.”

As part of discussions on the issue, Cllr Clarke, said as a farmer himself, he thought “35m was a bit tight to somebody’s land”, while Cllr McAleer asked how far the tank was from the farmer’s home - to which planners answered that it was in a different area.

Owners of the nearby home have to drive past the entrance to the slurry tank to get to their property

Owners of the nearby home have to drive past the entrance to the slurry tank to get to their property

Addressing the committee, head of planning, Dr Chris Boomer said: “In this case it’s quite tricky because it already exists. I can sense a general unease about the distance.”

After checking documents from Environmental Health, Dr Boomer said he was satisfied the home’s proximity to the tank had been considered in their recommendation to approve the slurry tank.

He also said that a wall erected between the properties and a roof over the tank were suggested to keep odours and noise down.

Unionist councillors McKinney and Cuthbertson proposed and seconded approval of retaining the tank, passing the planning application.