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Cookstown renal patient praises ‘freedom’ of new equipment

Alice Quinn with her Renal Nurse Specialist Louise Sloan

Alice Quinn with her Renal Nurse Specialist Louise Sloan

 

A renal patient from Cookstown has described how new technology available from the Northern Health and Social Care Trust has helped her feel in control of her condition and improved her quality of life.

Alice Quinn is 54 has Type 1 diabetes, which has caused chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a history of hypertension but the Telemonitoring NI service allows patients to monitor their health from their own homes by combining technology and services that enable patients with chronic diseases to test their vital signs such as pulse, blood pressure, body weight, temperature, blood glucose and oxygen levels at home on a daily basis.

Alice was first referred to the telemonitoring service in 2012 as a track and trend patient, which means she takes her blood pressure readings on a regular basis using the telemonitoring system, and these readings are then automatically uploaded to the monitoring centre. Alice’s Renal Nurse Specialist Louise Sloan then accesses the information collated to monitor Alice’s condition and determine the best course of treatment. Alice has used the system pre and post-transplant.

In January 2012 Alice’s renal function dropped below 20% and treatment commenced to prepare Alice for haemodialysis and kidney transplant. By November 2012 Alice was considered transplant-ready and she received her new kidney in April 2013, before she required dialysis.

Alice said: “Before telemonitoring I had to go to the centre to have my blood pressure taken and have my Erythropoietin (EPO) injections. I used to get stressed about appointments which sent my blood pressure up, and I ended up missing some. Having the telemonitoring installed meant I could take accurate blood pressure readings to suit myself at home, which meant I could do EPOs myself, like I do my insulin. Even now, after my transplant, the whole thing is so much easier because I’m not having to go for appointments all the time. It’s been so useful and helpful, I know much more about how to manage my own health now, and what to do if I’m having a bad day.”

“Unfortunately I had an acute episode recently which meant I had to be admitted to hospital, but having telemonitoring meant I was discharged early, as they were confident I was being monitored. I also feel I’m getting more specialised care – I don’t really see my GP much as the telemonitoring helps the renal team keep an eye on me and they can call me or visit when they need to.”

“I would absolutely recommend telemonitoring, its fantastic. I feel much more in control of my health, and I know if anything goes wrong or my meds need changing I have all the backing I need. I used to stress myself out worrying about my health but now I can just check my blood pressure at home in the morning then go on about my day. My family are much less worried about me now too.”

Anyone interested in this service should speak to the healthcare professionals involved in their care.

 
 
 

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