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Moy woman to sue British Government for father’s murder

Denise Mullan Fox who revisited the family home for the first time since the tragedy.INTT4313-301SR

Denise Mullan Fox who revisited the family home for the first time since the tragedy.INTT4313-301SR

 

The daughter of an SDLP activist is seeking leave to sue the British Government for the murder of her father in September 1975.

Denise Mullen Fox’s father Denis Mullen, described after his death as “a kindly and gentle Christian man of peace”, was gunned down at his home near Moy on September 1, 1975.

Denise, then four years old, found him on the doorstep of their house. He had been hit 17 times by bullets fired from a Sterling sub-machine gun.

Solicitor Kevin Winters, acting on behalf of Denise and other families whose loved ones were victims of the Glenanne Gang, is seeking to hold the British government to account in court.

The Mullen case figured in the recent book ‘Lethal Allies’ written by journalist Ann Cadwallader.

Denise said: “My father like so many others died because of actions taken, or in some cases not taken, by paid servants of the state who were ultimately responsible to the British cabinet of the day.

As in so many of these cases, the original crime was compounded by connivance, incompetence and downright sabotage of the criminal justice system.

“While two men were convicted of my father’s murder, one of them with security force connections, the fact is this gang which included serving policemen and UDR members was able to rampage throughout Armagh and mid-Ulster for years after that and murder people with some of the many hundreds of army guns that disappeared out of UDR barracks.”

Denise continued: “A properly run government would never have allowed this to happen or continue to happen long after Seamus Mallon and others had told them what was happening.”

In October last year, Denise made an emotional journey back to the former family home where her father was murdered.

 
 
 

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