New pavement completed on Magherafelt’s Broad Street

Pictured at the newly completed paving on Broad Street are:
Paul McCardle (Site Engineer), Alan Campbell (Site Supervisor), Tomasz Lengowski and Dean Hook.
Pictured at the newly completed paving on Broad Street are: Paul McCardle (Site Engineer), Alan Campbell (Site Supervisor), Tomasz Lengowski and Dean Hook.

The first section of new paving on Broad Street has been completed as part of the £1.9M public realm investment in Magherafelt.

The paving is part of the work to enhance the town with lighting, street furniture, signage and planting also included as part of the scheme which is being funded by Mid Ulster District Council and the Department for Social Development (DSD).

The public realm works will be carried out in The Diamond and connecting streets including Market Street, Rainey Street, Broad Street and Queen Street.

The contractor, FP McCann, has a 24hr site contact number, Tel: 028 7954 9090 (option3) and can be contacted by email at: mfeltpr@fpmccann.co.uk.

The traditional Thursday market which normally takes place in the Diamond is being held in Rainey Street car park for the duration of the public realm work.

Separate to the public realm work currently underway is sewer replacement work on Market Street in the town by Northern Ireland Water.

Its contractor, Quinn Automatic Ltd, will be on site from 7pm to 7am during May to undertake the emergency work with the intention of minimising disruption to businesses, their customers and road users.

More information and details of the public realm scheme are available at www.midulstercouncil.org/magherafeltpublicrealm.

Last week, it emerged that The Royal British Legion is hoping to locate a cenotaph in the central reservation at Broad Street, a short distance from the Bridewell.

The planning application has been lodged with planners and has yet to come before Mid Ulster Council’s planning committee for approval.

And it could be September before it is considered by the planning committee.

The application allows for a five-metre high memorial bearing the names of those killed during the two World Wars with the inscription ‘Our glorious dead.’ The three main Protestant churches have war cenotaphs and, if successful this will provide for the first time a neutral venue for all to remember the war dead.