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‘Onesie’ craze sweeps Mid Ulster for Autism Awareness

Pupils and staff from the Kiddies Castle Early Years, Castledawson, who joined in the fun of the World Autistic Society Onesie Wednesday raising awareness for Autism.

Pupils and staff from the Kiddies Castle Early Years, Castledawson, who joined in the fun of the World Autistic Society Onesie Wednesday raising awareness for Autism.

The Mid-Ulster Branch Support Group of the National Austistic Society (NAS) hosted ‘Onesie Wednesday’ to celebrate World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) on April 2nd.

This event encouraged residents to wear a onsie or pyjamas to school or work in the Mid-Ulster Area to spread the message that it’s okay to be different and to raise money to help local people affected by autism.

More than one in 100 people in the UK have autism, a lifelong disability which affects how a person interacts with others and makes sense of the world.

A spokesperson at the Mid-Ulster Branch of the NAS said, “Onesie Wednesday will be a lot of fun but it’s also an important way to raise money awareness of a lifelong disability.

People with autism experience social and communication difficulties which can make it difficult to ‘fit in’ and leave them feeling isolated. But we know that understanding from the public can make a huge difference, helping people with autism to access the right support and reach their full potential.

With the right support, people with autism can live the life they choose.”

Kiddie Castle Play Group, Castledawson got involved with the event, with the youngsters and their carers all dressing up in their onesies to raise awareness for autism.

Parents in Mid-Ulster will also benefit from a new book which shines a light on challenges that children with autism can experience in Primary School.

The book investigates the relationship between autism and the built environment.

The book is launched to coincide with the start of Autism Awareness Month in April, the book illustrates some of the ways in which the built environment is relevant to the everyday experience of the primary school pupil with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

The book has been printed and will be distributed free of charge to schools across Northern Ireland. It aims to promote a better understanding of an increasingly important issue in our society.

 

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