IN PICTURES: More old photographs from the News Letter photograph archives (1982)

Today we have another selection of photographs from the News Letter archives dating from 1982.

Friday, 12th March 2021, 12:00 pm
More than 50 teachers had launched the campaign to save the schools threatened with the axe. Teachers from Dunlamber Boys' and Somerdale Boys' Secondary Schools protesting outside the Belfast Education and Library Board office in February 1982. In a statement issued to the News Letter the teachers stated: “There is not a single educational reason to justify the decision to close either of these schools. It will effectively destroy an exercise of parental choice of schools in north Belfast. It will handicap an progress towards a properly planned rationalisation of resources in north Belfast for the next twenty years.” The staff at Somerdale school had blocked the Crumlin Road for 30 minutes during their lunchtime before joining their Dunlambert colleagues in a delegation to the board headquarters in Academy Street. Picture: News Letter archives
More than 50 teachers had launched the campaign to save the schools threatened with the axe. Teachers from Dunlamber Boys' and Somerdale Boys' Secondary Schools protesting outside the Belfast Education and Library Board office in February 1982. In a statement issued to the News Letter the teachers stated: “There is not a single educational reason to justify the decision to close either of these schools. It will effectively destroy an exercise of parental choice of schools in north Belfast. It will handicap an progress towards a properly planned rationalisation of resources in north Belfast for the next twenty years.” The staff at Somerdale school had blocked the Crumlin Road for 30 minutes during their lunchtime before joining their Dunlambert colleagues in a delegation to the board headquarters in Academy Street. Picture: News Letter archives

There are several interesting photographs including a selection of photographs related to a protest campaign which had been launched to save the schools threatened with the axe. Teachers, parents and taxi drivers all joined the campaign to save from Dunlamber Boys’ and Somerdale Boys’ Secondary Schools.

Meanwhile there are also photographs of industry minister Adam Butler when he had travelled to Carrickfergus in Co Antrim in February 1982 to launch a job creation scheme. Mr Butler was told by the mayor of the town, Mayor Alderman Ken McFaul, that he was “unwelcome”. Mr McFaul was joined by six other loyalist councillors who accused Mr Butler of “selling out to the enemies of Ulster”.

See who you might see from days gone by.

Police take the names and addresses of black taxi drivers in February 1982 after they threw their weight behind the street campaign to save Dunlambert Boys' and Somerdale Boys' Secondary schools. Their cabs were used to block traffic at the Antrim Road, Donegall Street and Shankill Road. The drivers joined parents from both schools on the picket line. Picture: News Letter archives

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More than 300 people filled the assembly hall at Dunlambert Boys' Secondary School in north Belfast to hear a range of speakers, including the Reverend Ian Paisley, and to sign a declaration of disgust at the attitude of the Belfast Education and Library Board. Anger at the board's decision was evident from the start and many of the parents carried placards with slogans such as 'Educational vandalism' and 'We say no to closure'. The declaration stated: “We demand the full exercise of parental choice in the selection of a school for our children. Our choice is to continue to send them to Dunlambert. Picture: News Letter archives
Industry minister Adam Butler travelled to Carrickfergus in Co Antrim in February 1982 to launch a job creation scheme was was told by the mayor of the town that he was “unwelcome”. Mr Butler's arrival for the announcement that Enterprise Carrickfergus would received a £235,000 EEC grant for the creation of new jobs in the industrially rundown town brought him face-to-face with protesting DUP Mayor Alderman Ken McFaul and six other loyalist councillors who accused him of “selling out to the enemies of Ulster”. Above, the minister is confronted by the Mayor of Carrickfergus Councillor McFaul as he arrives at Carrickfergus Castle. Below, Mr Butler, centre, with Councillor Paddy Conway, right, chairman of Enterprise Carrickfergus, and board member Robert Hunter. Pictures: News Letter archives
Famed Whitehall farceur Brian Rix, president of Mencap, and his actress wife, Elspeth Grey, who were the guests of honour at the Institute of Public Relations dinner at the Dunadry in Co Antrim in February 1982. They are pictured with the institute chairman Brian Parker and his wife Happy. Picture: News Letter archives
Mr Trevor Hall, centre left, presents a cheque on behalf of Charles Hurst to Mr Alfie Gregg, treasurer of the Road Safety Council of Northern Ireland, to sponsor the Charles Hurst Road Safety Quiz. Included are Mr Stanley Mullan, chairman of the Road Safety Council of Northern Ireland, left, and Mr Ivan Montgomery, president of the Road Safety Council of Northern Ireland. Picture: News Letter archives
Anne Smith, a quilt maker from the Portaferry Road in Newtownards, Co Down, with a St Valentine's quality made of hearts and flowers – one of the items at an exhibition of her work in the Octagon Gallery, Lower Crescent, Belfast, in February 1982. Picture: News Letter archives
The Lord Mayor of Belfast, Councillor Mrs Grace Bannister, received members of the Belfast Soroptomists' Club at the City Hall in February 1982. She is pictured with Miss Betty Irwin, second from right, president, Miss Margaret Lack, right, vice president, Miss Myrtle Boal, left, and Miss Dill Henderson, secretary. Picture: News Letter archives
Concern was growing in the Dundonald area over the plan to site a rubbish collection centre in a residential area. The site, beside the playing fields ion the East Link, which joined the Old Dundonald and Comber Roads, was surrounded by hundreds of houses, including two new developments. Residents had started a campaign to have the dump moved elsewhere. And they had the support of DUP and Official Unionists members of Castlereagh Borough Council. Pictured are resident Mr Leslie Hill and DUP councillor Cedric Wilson. Mr Leslie told the News Letter: “On paper this might seem a suitable site but we will have to at the dump every day of our lives. We have already had a lot of trouble with vermin and this will only encourage them.” He added: “Something has to be done about this, it's us that have to live here not the civil servants and we are going to do everything we can to stop the dump being built here.” Picture: News Letter archives